Medical Assistants Recognition Week Comes to a Close

Medical Assistants are the heart of healthcare. They are there to provide a comforting presence to their patients, and assist the medical team.  Being a medical assistant is a challenging and rewarding career, but before one can become a Certified Medical Assistant, they must learn the skills necessary to provide their patients with the best care. 

At Platt College we get the opportunity to teach and guide some of the most amazing students. Being that this past week was Medical Assistant Recognition Week, we took the time to talk to some of our Medical Assisting students about their choice of career path.

When asked, Platt students had many different reasons why they chose the Medical Assisting program.  Reasons like Mikayla Rosado, Medical Assisting student at our Lawton campus. “I chose medical assisting because I wanted to help people,” says Rosado. She was a little intimidated by nursing, so she chose to get started as a Medical Assistant, with the option to go back and become a nurse once she feels more comfortable in the field.  Medical Assisting student at our Central Oklahoma City campus, Caroline Villanueva, chose Medical Assisting because it was a desire for her. “I have been in the medical field for 15+ years and I love it,” says Villanueva. “I wanted to expand my career.” MA student David Ortega at our North Oklahoma City campus, chose Medical Assisting because he wanted to “feel proud of [his] job and help people.”

Training to be a medical assistant can be a demanding, but fulfilling endeavor. While there are many reasons that would make someone a great medical assistant. We asked some of our MA students what they would say to someone who’s thinking about a career in the field. Candice Selfridge from our Tulsa campus said that a career in Medical Assisting is “worth it”.  “This program will change your life,” says Selfridge. “It did mine.” MA student, Teresa Reyes, from our Lawton campus feels that if someone really likes the healthcare field, then they should “just do it.” In addition, Reyes boasts, “Platt College is a good college to do it at. It’s a good program, but people need to set up priorities if they really want to succeed.”

The Medical Assistants Recognition Week celebrations may have come to an end, but we continue to be extremely proud of all of our students in the Medical Assisting program at each of our Platt College campuses. They’re on-going success will always remain our top priority, as it is for every one of our Platt College students.

Are you interested in becoming a medical assistant? Fill out the form below to request info about the Medical Assisting program at the campus closest to you.

Written by: Jennifer Robinson, Social Media Coordinator/Blog Editor – Platt College

Spotlight on a Graduate: Erika Brown

Erika Brown began her educational journey after high school at Cameron University as a Graphic Design/Business major, but being a single mother with 2 kids to support on her own, Brown needed “something steady”. She wanted a career she could be proud of. “I want to set a good example for my kids and be able to provide for them since it’s just me.” Brown appreciated the opportunities that a medical assisting program like the one at Platt College could offer.  Additionally she had the go ahead from her mother who attended the pharmacy tech program at Platt many years ago and said that Brown would “love it because the staff is awesome and the instructors really care.”

We interviewed Erika about her time at Platt and the experiences she had in this Spotlight on a Graduate:

What makes Platt College special?Erika-Brown---MA-edit

EB: The instructors make it special.  The instructors and staff care and take extra time to help you succeed. Ms. Angie Gibbs and Miss Nadine Balser-Ayers are my favorite instructors because they pushed me even when I didn’t think I could do it.

What have you learned that made a difference to you?

EB: I learned a better understanding of how an office works and how to treat patients.  I learned that you can’t judge a book by its cover.  You never know what someone might be going through so you need to have compassion.

Tell us about a great experience you had at Platt?

EB: Miss Angie took a group of us to Willow Rehab Center to do injections and there was this patient, she was an older lady. She couldn’t speak and was scared because she wasn’t used to having a lot of people around her.  I was the one who had to calm her down, so that she could get her injection. I was able to do that and she was even happy afterwards. It was a great moment because I was able to talk to her and make her feel less scared.

What has been your greatest challenge and how did you overcome it?

EB: My greatest challenge was overcoming the fear of failing.  I had to learn to believe in myself and when I did, I shocked myself with A’s and B’s instead of failing!

What do you plan to do after graduation?

EB: I had planned to go right into the LPN program, but I decided to go to work in an office first and get some more experience and then go into the LPN program at Platt next year.

Where do you see yourself 5 years from now?

EB: I see myself graduated from the Practical Nursing program at Platt College, working at an OB/GYN office or Family Practice. I would also like to work as a floater nurse and try different specialties.

What advice would you give incoming students?

EB: Don’t Quit! We all have our struggles and doubts, but just keep going. The first 3 months is the hardest, but when you get to the end, you will be so proud and there are people there to help you along the way.  There are so many opportunities I have now! I am so glad that I made the choice to come to Platt and become a Medical Assistant.

Since completing the Medical Assisting/Phlebotomy program, Brown has gone on to take her certification tests and is now a Registered Medical Assistant and Registered Phlebotomist. She was offered a position at East Lawton Neighborhood Family Clinic, where she did her clinicals. “I am extremely blessed to have a job and work at a place I love and be able to support my family as well.”

If you’re interested in becoming a Medical Assistant or getting started on your career training in any of the programs we offer at Platt College click here to fill out the contact us form and request information.

Written by: Jennifer Robinson, Social Media Coordinator/Blog Editor – Platt College

Tips for a Healthy and Happy Fourth of July

The Fourth of July is one of the most celebrated holidays of the year and rightfully so.  We’re celebrating the birth of, not only our nation, but the birth of democracy itself.  And how do we choose to celebrate? With fireworks, family, sunshine and barbecues, of course!

But the holiday can also come with a few potential hazards if you’re not careful. Not to worry; we’ve got some helpful tips to make this Fourth a happy and healthy one!

Bring some earplugs

And no, they’re not to tune out your annoying cousin Larry.  Fireworks can produce a sound output that is in the 150 to 175 decibel range. The World Health Organization recommends that adults not be exposed to more than 140 decibels of peak sound pressure and for children, the recommendation is 120 decibels. Ear protection is recommended for decibels above 85.  So be sure to grab a pair of earplugs before you head out to enjoy the fireworks.

Apply Sunscreen

To keep your skin from matching the red, in the red, white, and blue of the American flag, you’ll want to apply sunscreen.  According to the American Academy of Dermatology it takes approximately 15 minutes for your skin to absorb the sunscreen and protect you. So you’ll want to put it on before you’re out in the sun. You’ll want to use something with an SPF of 30 or higher, that is water resistant and provides broad-spectrum coverage. Reapply every couple of hours to prevent sunburn. Follow the American Academy of Dermatology’s tips on How to apply sunscreen and you should be covered.

Stay Hydrated

Being outside in the sun for a picnic or barbeque cookout can make you more susceptible to dehydration and other health risks. Keeping a bottle of water nearby will help to keep you cool and hydrated throughout the day’s festivities. Plus alternating each alcoholic beverage (if you are of age) with a bottle of water, will help to stave off alcohol-induced dehydration.

Practice Safe Barbecuing

So you’re the one who’s manning or woman-ing the grill; then it’s up to you to make sure that you’re practicing safe barbecuing. This means that you’re designating different plates for the raw and cooked meat, you’re marinating food in the refrigerator and not out on the counter, you’re cooking the food thoroughly, you’re not leaving the food out in the sun for more than 2 hours (one if temperatures are really extreme), and you’re following the manufacturer’s instructions for safely operating your grill.

Follow these tips and you’re sure to have a happy and healthy Fourth of July!

Written by: Jennifer Robinson, Social Media Coordinator/Blog Editor – Platt College

A Closer Look at the Farm-to-Table Movement

The Farm-to-Table Movement has become increasing popular within the culinary community.  It has been one of the biggest trends to hit the industry in a while, but what exactly is Farm-to-Table Cuisine?

Farm-to-Table Cuisine is a phrase that has been thrown around, talked about in chef interviews, and added to the chicest of menus, but is it really something new?

“The idea of Farm-to-Table is not a new ideology or method of thinking about cooking.” Says Director of Education and Pastry Arts Director, Chef Gene Leiterman of Platt College Moore, OK. “After all, up until a few generations ago, we were much more connected to our food source.  Our milk, meat, and vegetables were sourced from our local dairy, butcher, and market, which in turn, came from the local farmers in the region we lived in.” For centuries all food was farm to table. People either grew their own foods or bought them from a nearby farmer. All food that was put on the table was literally farm to table and nothing in between.

It wasn’t until more people began moving away from rural areas and into the cities that many local food sources disappeared. The building of interstate highway systems and improvements in shipping techniques, such as refrigerated transportation, made it easier to bring in food from further away.  Food was no longer harvested from the farm and served within a day or so. The longer the time between harvesting and actually eating, the more quality was lost.

The Farm-to-Table movement was formed by a desire to bring quality ingredients back to the table.

“The movement to reconnect to our food origins in the purest sense has become a way of life and a new restaurant model under many fashionable names and concepts. And if the local “Whole Foods” has done anything, it has brought food culture into the consciousness of popular culture.” Says Chef Leiterman.

The Traits of Farm-to-Table Cuisine

The recent popularity of the farm-to-table concept has the phrase popping up in restaurants everywhere, but how can we know that we are actually getting authentic farm to table cuisine? Here are some traits to look for:

Regional, Seasonal, and Clean

Most of the ingredients you will find in farm-to-table cuisine are regional, seasonal, and clean.  These concepts are actually very simple. First of all you want the ingredients to come from nearby. Ideally the chef would be able to tell you exactly what farm the ingredients came from, but in the very least he or she should be able to say that they were purchased from a local farmer’s market or co-op.  Next, you’ll want make sure everything being served is in season. You wouldn’t find fresh peach cobbler in Michigan in January, just like you wouldn’t find cranberry sauce in Texas in July. Lastly you want your food to be clean and fresh. The concept of clean eating is similar to that of farm-to-table. Basically you want to see that your food is in the most natural form possible and minimally processed.  If you were to tour the kitchen of the restaurant you would want to see produce in its original state, not row upon row of canned food.

Heirloom and Heritage

Many ingredients in Farm-to-Table Cuisine are heirloom and heritage produce and meat.  Heirloom is a designation for produce that hasn’t been crossbred with any other varieties for several generations and hasn’t been genetically modified.  Heritage essentially means the same thing, but for meats. The terms are often used interchangeably.  These types of foods are not hybridized and because of that they are hardier and bursting with flavor. When a farmer takes the time to save the seeds and produce heirloom foods generation after generation, he or she is preserving a flavor and particular piece of history within that food.

“Whether you know it as Farm-to-Table, local or regional cuisine, or clean food and to some extent sustainable and organic – the notion is very simple: know where your food comes from and be thoughtful and deliberate about the way you use it to harness the purest expression of its value.” Adds Chef Leiterman.

To learn more about Farm-to-Table cuisine or the Culinary Arts Program at Platt College click here and fill out the Request Info Form.

Written by: Jennifer Robinson, Social Media Coordinator – Platt College

Study Techniques That Compliment Your Learning Style

shutterstock_217035208_renderedStudy, study, study. Do you find yourself studying excessively, but your grades aren’t reflecting all the effort you’re putting in? Then maybe you aren’t studying in ways that compliment your learning style. Contrary to popular opinion, textbooks and lectures might not be the only way to prepare yourself for an exam.

What is a learning style and how does it effect me?

Learning style has to do with the different ways that people bring in and absorb new information. Knowing your learning style can help you use your strengths when studying.

Ever wondered why you do well in some classes and not in others? This may depend on your learning style. Whether taking a regular class or studying for a major exam you can greatly increase your productivity by tailoring your study habits to compliment your particular learning style.

You might be a Visual Learner if…

If you never forget a face, but have trouble remembering people’s names then you might be a Visual Learner. If you’d rather watch the movie than read the book, you might be a visual learner. Visual learners process information best when it’s presented to them visually.

Study tips for Visual Learners:shutterstock_280433198_rendered

Take detailed notes

Whether you are sitting in class or reading a text book, make sure to take lots of notes. By taking copious amounts of detailed notes you give yourself the ability to review what was covered later at your own pace, and the act of note-taking itself contributes to your absorption of the material.

Watch a video on the topic

Like I said before, if you’d rather watch the movie, then maybe you should. Now this doesn’t mean go watch the new Star Wars movie instead of studying. It means finding videos online that cover what you are studying. Whether you Google a short clip to answer a particular question or you use an online learning resource like Khan Academy, you will find videos to be strong study aids. Note: Make sure your videos come from reputable sources.

Use Flashcards

Flash cards will help you learn the subject using repetition to ensure you retain the knowledge. There are many apps available if you don’t feel like making your own flash cards. Apps such as Chegg Flashcards and Studyblue allow you to keep score and track your stats so that you know what areas you need to focus on.

 You might be an Auditory Learner if…

If you find you enjoy humming aloud or talking to yourself, you might be an Auditory Learner. If you remember words to songs and notice sound effects in movies, then you might be an Auditory learner. This just means that you study best by listening. Auditory Learners tend to perform the best in classes that emphasize lectures and class discussions.

Study tips for Auditory Learners:

Record your lecturesshutterstock_272450690_rendered

Recording your lectures allows you to listen to them again when trying to study. There are many apps available.

Verbalize what you’ve learned.

In the same way that visual learners learn from writing notes, auditory learners can solidify their learning by verbalizing what they’ve learned. Put it into your own words, this helps you to truly grasp the subject and remember it longer.

Read aloud

Read aloud whenever possible. After reading a chapter, summarize it out loud.

Use Mnemonic Devices

A mnemonic device is a pattern of letters, ideas, or associations that assists in remembering something. Using a mnemonic device can make remembering dull or difficult to learn material such as numbers, formulas, dates, terminology, or concepts easier and maybe even a little fun.

Work in Groups

When working in a group you can discuss the subject and better absorb the material. You can also quiz each other.

You might be a Tactile/Kinesthetic Learner if…

If you hate using an owner’s manual when you buy a new gadget or reading the instructions to put together IKEA furniture, then you might be a kinesthetic learner. If you tap your feet to music and can’t sit still in lectures, you might be a kinesthetic learner. This means you comprehend information best through hands-on learning. Kinesthetic learners tend to do better in labs than in lectures.

Study Tips for Kinesthetic Learners:girl typing on laptop with socks

Apply what you’ve learned

If you’re studying from a textbook, you can get frustrated pretty quickly. To combat this frustration and better understand the material you covered, look for practical applications for what you’ve just learned.

Take short study breaks

Rather than forcing yourself to sit and study for long periods, break up your study sessions into 30 minute increments with 5 minute breaks in between to stand up and move around. This can be beneficial to all students, but especially for kinesthetic learners.

Keep your hands busy while studying

Believe it or not, kinesthetic learners study and comprehend information better when their hands are involved. It can be as simple as holding an object, like a stress ball, while studying or typing out your notes.

What to keep in mind

 No matter what your predominant learning style may be, it’s important that you keep in mind that it’s just your predominant, not your only learning style. Most of us are a mix of all three.  Don’t be afraid to try methods from other learning styles as well. The goal is to find what methods work best for you.

 Find Out Your Learning Style

You can find out what your preferred learning style is by taking the assessment found here.

Written by: Jennifer Robinson, Social Media Coordinator – Ancora Education